• "For Hambling drawing was and remains ‘the most direct and most intimate thing an artist can do'."

    Maggi Hambling, quoted in Judith Bumpus' text on her drawings in the solo exhibition catalogue, Serpentine Gallery, 1987 


     

  • IAP Fine Art is delighted to offer this charcoal drawing by Maggi Hambling, which has been in a private collection...

    Maggi Hambling photographed by Lucinda Douglas- Menzies

    IAP Fine Art is delighted to offer this charcoal drawing by Maggi Hambling, which has been in a private collection since it featured in the artist's major solo exhibition at the Serpentine Gallery in 1987.  It is a superbly executed drawing, and a study for the large painting 'Pasiphae & The Bull'.  Both drawing and painting are reproduced in the exhibition catalogue, which has an excellent introductory essay by Peter Fuller.  Please contact us for further details. 

     

    The following are  excerpts from Peter Fuller's catalogue text about the painting for which this drawing is the only study: 

     

    "According to the legend, the minotaur came into being because Poseidon, the God of the Sea, caused Pasiphae, the wife of Minos, to become enamoured of a great bull which had been held back from sacrifice.  Pasiphae told Daedalus, an exiled Athenian craftsman, about her strange passion and Daedalus made a fake cow for her, constructed out of hide, cast over a wooden frame on wheels.

     

    The contraption was placed in the meadow where the great bull grazed, and Pasiphae slid inside it, with her legs splayed out inside its make-shift hind-quarters.  The great bull was deceived, and mounted her, and so she had her pleasure.  Hambling has depicted their union in a shocking picture, Pasiphae and the Bull,  1987 (PL. 12) [since she..]  dispensed with the cow-hide to bare Pasiphae’s white and fragile flanks to our gaze, or contrived to place the bull’s enormous black member at the very pivot of his picture.

     

    The minotaur was, of course, the monstrous progeny of this union.  Minos gave orders that every ninth year seven young men, and seven maidens, should be sacrificed to the flesh-eating creature . The victims were released into the maze of the Labyrinth where the minotaur waited to ensnare and to devour them. " 

     

      

  • "She does not deny our animal nature; but still finds hints of the great redemptive promises which religion once offered." 

    (Peter Fuller, Serpentine exhibition catalogue, 1987)

  • Study for Pasiphae And The Bull ,1987 - detail of the frame backing with labels.

    Study for Pasiphae And The Bull ,1987 -  detail of the frame backing with labels.

  • 'Study for Pasiphae and the Bull' is also reproduced in the Serpentine exhibition catalogue on page 26. For all enquiries...

    'Study for Pasiphae and the Bull' is also reproduced in the Serpentine exhibition catalogue on page 26.

    For all enquiries regarding this  drawing, including price and shipping, please contact us

  • The major solo exhibition 'MAGGI HAMBLING, Paintings, Drawings and Watercolours' at the Serpentine Gallery, 17 October - 22 November 1987,... The major solo exhibition 'MAGGI HAMBLING, Paintings, Drawings and Watercolours' at the Serpentine Gallery, 17 October - 22 November 1987,... The major solo exhibition 'MAGGI HAMBLING, Paintings, Drawings and Watercolours' at the Serpentine Gallery, 17 October - 22 November 1987,...

    The major solo exhibition 'MAGGI HAMBLING, Paintings, Drawings and Watercolours' at the Serpentine Gallery,  17 October - 22 November 1987, was supported by the Baring Foundation, and included new works alongside works borrowed from the collections of the British Museum and the National Portrait Gallery.

     

    It was accompanied by a full colour catalogue, with foreword by Alister Warman, Director of Serpentine, and an introductory essay on Maggi Hambling and her works for the exhibition by Dame Marina Warner, as well as texts by leading critics Richard Cork, Peter Fuller and Judith Bumpus.  Study for Pasiphae and the Bull is featured in the catalogue beside Peter Fuller's essay.